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2004/06/21 rpc


© June 2004 Tony Lawrence

Remote Procedure Call. The concept here is that a program on one computer can use a service on another computer without being bothered with the details of network communication. The "rpcinfo" program can tell you what rpc services are available on a server; the list might look like this:


   program vers proto   port
    100000    2   tcp    111  portmapper
    100000    2   udp    111  portmapper
    100005    3   udp   1023  mountd
    100005    3   tcp   1023  mountd
    100005    1   udp   1023  mountd
    100005    1   tcp   1023  mountd
    100003    2   udp   2049  nfs
    100003    3   udp   2049  nfs
    100003    2   tcp   2049  nfs
    100003    3   tcp   2049  nfs
    100024    1   udp   1011  status
    100024    1   tcp   1022  status
 

Rpc services don't necessarily run on any specific port. The "portmapper" service, which always runs on port 111, can be queried to find the port number for a desired service. Rpc services register with portmapper, which usually means that it must start before inetd (because the rpc services are usually started by inetd or xinetd).


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